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3 Ways to Transition to Freelance Successfully

Is leaving your job and going into freelancing full-time one of your goals for the year? As someone who transitioned from a 9-to-5 to freelancing, I know the questions you might have in mind. Questions like: “Am I making the right choice?” “Will I be able to make enough money in my first month to pay the bills and still get myself nice things?” “Will I be able to find clients or will anyone want to hire me?”

Leaving your stable job to go all in to a business where you cannot guarantee right away the level of income you’ll make is a terrifying step to take. However, with a clear plan that will help you ease into your dream life as a freelancer, you can safely transition to freelancing.

All it takes is to honestly answer these three questions. The answers you give will determine if you’re ready to jump into freelancing or if you need a bit more preparation before you dive into it full-time.

 

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Question #1: On a scale of 1 to 10 how ready are you emotionally to dive into freelancing?

I agree that wanting to make the transition to being a full-time freelancer is nerve-wracking. But if you have a conviction that you will succeed and if you trust yourself that you have what it takes to thrive in the freelance industry, then there’s no stopping you.

Most of the times, people allow the fear of the unknown to paralyze their effort to actually make something big out of themselves. This kind of negative thinking is not a healthy sign of someone who is ready to create a career in freelancing.

It’s okay to be nervous or scared but so long as you believe in yourself and are determined to do what it takes to give value and grow as a freelancer, then you’re on the right track.

 

Question #2: On a scale of 1 to 10 how ready are you professionally and personally for freelancing?

Unlike working in a 9-to-5 where you’re accountable to your employer, as a freelancer, you are your own boss. Being the boss comes with a lot of responsibilities and you need to train yourself to handle such responsibilities.

Professionally, freelancing is a huge shift from the conventional. The freelancer lifestyle is very different from what you’re used to. It involves you spending most of your time at home and alone.

You have to be sure that you’ll be able to handle the changes that come with being a freelancer. Are you really ready for these changes and do you have a plan B just in case things don’t turn out according to plan? Or do you still need more time to accept the change?

 

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Question #3: On a scale of 1 to 10 how ready are you commercially to be a freelancer?

You need to be aware of the risks involved with doing freelancing full-time. Are you financially ready to dive into the freelance career? Do you have enough money to live on pending when you are able to receive a comfortable income from freelancing? Do you already have a steady flow of client projects each month?

You can’t predict your income as a freelancer the way you could while working as an employee. Freelancing full-time has its highs and lows. And unless you’re financially ready to take the leap, then it’s best to work towards it.

 

Grade yourself

The highest score is 30. So if you got more than 15 then you’re ready to pursue your freelance career headlong. But if you got anything less than 15, then don’t worry. It’s only a sign that you have to work on yourself and make the necessary preparations to transition to freelancing.

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18 responses

  1. This is really interesting! I have recently become freelance/self employed and it is such a different world. It’s the lack of consistent/guaranteed income that takes some getting used to 🙂

  2. Freelancing has been a slow transition for me. I just cannot organise my time and I am really distracted by other tasks that need to be done in the home. We have a good home office but I share it with my Husband so that is a distraction.

  3. THIS IS SUCH GOOD ADVICE AND A POST THAT I AM SURE MANY WILL BE INTERESTED AND HELPED BY. I UNDERSTAND IT WOULD BE QUITE A LENGHTY PROCESS.

  4. I am glad you considered the psychological as well as the financial implications of freelancing. I think it takes some time to prepare your family for the fact that you might be home but not available.

    • It is not for everyone for sure but I can’t imagine having a regular job now. The pros massively outweigh the cons.

  5. Freelancing isn’t easy but can be so rewarding and I wouldn’t want it any other way. Some great food for thought here.

  6. Some good questions there – too many people these days jump from blogging to freelance thinking it’s easy and it’s not. I freelanced for 2years both with my blog and as a Marketing Consultant, I’m now back in full time work and very happy with my decision (and the money!) but it was a great time which I thoroughly enjoyed.

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