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The Best Way to Fix your Tattoo

Anyone who has a bad tattoo must have watched the horrors of the TV programme – Tattoo Fixers. There is nothing wrong with this programme, but for television and entertainment they really have picked out the most horrendous tattoos to ‘fix’. But even after the artists alterations…it’s still a tattoo!
However If you have a body design that maybe just brings back bad memories or maybe was done when you were perhaps drunk, out partying with your mates as a dare and you now wish you had never had it done then maybe you should read this. Believe me – removing the tattoo for good is the only way to wipe out that mistake.
There’s good news and bad news for fixing your tattoo once and for all….but the bad news is just the mild discomfort…but can you remember the pain of getting done? Probably not!!! You might remember it all with regrets and possibly a hangover the next day! However the good news is that most body designs can be removed and done by an expert and you will not ‘ragret’ it!!

 

No Ragrets Image

 

Most important is the fact that ALL body designs are unique – AND even more important everyone has unique skin. This means you need expert advice and attention to assess your individual needs.
Here are some key facts to consider:
Tattoos vary and so does the treatment
Every client considering tattoo removal needs to be aware that the treatment provided really depends on the tattoo itself. Older ink and black ink tends to be much easier to remove than coloured ink. The length of treatment greatly depends on these factors. Usually treatments are approximately 8 weeks apart and may require 8 to 15 laser sessions depending on the individual and tattoo.

So your choice in the locality of a specialist clinic is a main consideration.
Faster removal is not always best advice – Be wary of any clinics that tells you otherwise. Most laser tattoo removal clients want get rid of their tattoos as quickly as possible. However, aggressive tattoo removal means that there is a higher chance of scarring which nobody wants. Individual assessment of your skin is necessary to make sure a delicate removal procedure is conducted which reduces the risk of scarring.

So don’t rush into your decision as you did when you had the tattoo done in the first place – do some research in your locality and find an expert clinic.

Basically this is how the tattoo laser removal treatment works:

The lasers break down the ink in your skin which allows the body to flush it out of your system. Without getting to technical, essentially the laser goes into the dermis layer of skin until it reaches the ink. Next, the ink is broken down into tiny particles which allows the lymphatic system (the network of vessels in our body) to dispose of. Essentially the broken down ink is absorbed by the body and removed by the lymphatic system.

 

layers-of-human-skin-diagram

 

At The Fylde Clinic, only impartial advice is provided to clients to ensure they get the right treatment for their individual needs. For more information about tattoo removal, visit the website.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you have a tattoo you regret having?

 

*This is a collaborative post.

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36 responses

  1. Love tattoos! I have 16. Not big horrible ones. I have things like trailing roses, autumn leaves, butterflies and so on. Just had a Tinkerbelle done before we went away. My favorite is the angel prying over a sleeping baby in a cot on my back I had just after mom died. Not cos of mom. However the timing was perfect. I went on to have an ink written epitaph to Mom put above it

    No regrets from me. Stone cold sober for them all. I had a cover over done on one years ago as it had the ex name on.

    I see my tattoos as being a statement about me. Some hang there art. I wear mine. Not for everyone I know. My next one next year will be a lion (I am a Leo) in abstract. Not a normal lion pic.

  2. I love tattoos and have 3 but they all mean something special to me. So many people just get them done for the sake of it or when drunk at parties. Great post 🙂

  3. i love tattoos I’ve just never found one I think I wouldn’t get bored of, interesting post on the removal process thank you for sharing k x

  4. Ooh I’ve always wondered how the laser removal process works, how interesting!
    I have a few tattoos and definitely want more – I’m the kind of person who, even if I went off one in the future, would still love it because I loved it when I got it done.
    I got my first one almost six years ago and still love it because it means a lot to me, my second was just for fun but I’m always told it suits my personality and I still love it. And my most recent is a matching one with my brother, which we did get after a night out admittedly, but I do love it and it’s my Mum’s name, so I don’t see myself going off that one either 🙂

    Jess xo
    http://www.theindigohours.co.uk

  5. Both my partner and I have tattoos but we put a lot of thought into what we were getting and paid a lot to go to very good tattoo artists (which makes a massive difference) and we don’t regret any but I would say first make sure you are 100% happy with what you are getting.

    Laura x

  6. I am not a fan of tattoos and I have seen what they look like once people get old and it ain’t pretty to me but i think if people want to have them they should and if they want to fix them at least there are options

  7. I am too chicken to get a tattoo and plus the fact, knowing me, have a reaction 😦
    I loved your picture, that film is good!

    good advice though, seriously think about your choice, because it is pretty much with you for life.

  8. I don’t think I’ll ever get a tattoo precisely because I don’t want to go through the hassle of having it removed or changed one day!

  9. I haven’t got a tattoo but my brothers have quite a few. One of them even bought himself the equipment to do it at home, but he’s not an artist, bless him and when he was 20, he drew a pretty ugly tic tac toe on his thigh. Need I say he was drunk?

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