My Book: How To Cash In As A Blogger

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Hey peeps. My eBook is finally available on Amazon, and I am super-duper excited, yayyy.  I have been working on and off on this book for almost a year now, if you remember, I wrote my about my book updates quite a few times, and I am so excited it is finally finished and ready to read to download.

The book is all about how to make a success of your blog and how to start making some form of money from your blog. It is currently free for the next 3 months for Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscribers to download, so get in there. For non Amazon Prime subscribers, it goes for £3.44 for the first 3 months.

Here is the book description on Amazon below:

Learn the Secret to Earning Money through Blogging!
Are you struggling to make your blog popular or to make money from your blog? Do you feel like giving up on the dream of becoming a professional blogger? Contemporary writer and popular blogger Stella Olojola has something important to say; something that can save your blogging career and help you make money from your blog. In her recently launched book, “How to ‘Cash In’ as a Blogger”, Stella has outlined some of the vital aspects of the industry. Years of experience and in-depth research has helped her create this all-inclusive guide that every aspiring blogger would find helpful.

“How to ‘Cash In’ as a Blogger” is the definitive go-to guide that sheds light on the rather unconventional world of blogging. In the opening pages of the book, you will get to know the real inspiration behind this book. Stella moves on to give the readers an account of her own personal journey. Divided into 11 chapters, “How to ‘Cash In’ as a Blogger”, explores all the crucial areas such as branding, search engine optimisation, photography tips, media kits, making money from adverts, affiliate links, sponsored posts and product reviews, and much more!

 

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It has been my childhood dream to write a book, and I am happy to have finally taken the bold step. I will be printing a few paper copies, so let me know if you prefer to read it in flesh, lol.

You can download the book here on Amazon

I hope you get to read this book, if you do, please leave me a review, and let me know what you think.

You can also chat me up on Twitter – @Olojay or my Facebook page

Happy reading x

 

Fashion vs Feminism

There are a group of women that tend to look down on any woman who takes her looks seriously, and I wonder why. I for one, love to look good, and I appreciate beautiful things. I love my makeup, my hair extensions and wigs, my nice clothes, shoes and bags, and I love experimenting with various beauty treatments. So does that make me a feminist or a non feminist?

I think every woman has the potential to be a stunner, with the right clothes, accessories and makeup. I also believe, some women are natural stunners, so they do not have to try as hard as others, but I don’t see women who take the time to wear makeup, and nice clothes as non feminists, just like I don’t see women that do not put on makeup or trendy clothes as feminists. Fashion and feminism can go hand in hand, but they don’t have to.

Bare Legs Outfit Post

 

However, every now and again, I come across a blog post, comment, or a magazine article, that makes me wonder why so many women have a problem with fashion or beauty. I wonder why they have this hostile relationship with anything fashion or beauty related, with the passive aggressive remarks like – ‘I don’t have time for makeup, I have no interest in fashion, I hardly get dressed these days, I am a feminist, I don’t have any desire to be beautiful or desired by men, I am a feminist, I don’t need to have my body hairs permanently taken off’, I can go on and on with the funny remarks I read everywhere, and you will be still be reading this post for hours. These funny remarks make me wonder, so this post is all about me wondering out aloud, forgive me.

Fashion and feminism have a lot in common, and at the same time have nothing in common, it depends on you and how you see things.  I believe they have a lot in common. I am a feminist but I am also a fashion and beauty enthusiast. I hardly have makeup on most days, or have my hair styled (disclosure: typing this post in my pyjamas), but I appreciate stylish clothes and beauty, and I love looking good. I won’t go to an event without looking my best, I take delight in looking good.

So if there is a new pair of leggings that will provide tummy control, and support, I will wear it, if I need to get my teeth whitened, I will, like I have done before (actually I need a top up soon), if there is a laser hair removal treatment to get rid of body hairs, I will have it done, and I am currently having it done, because I CAN.

OOTD The Suede Look Picture

Another issue I have noticed recently, is the hate most feminists have for reality stars and shows. Being a feminist does not mean you are not allowed to like reality shows. I see many women ashamed to say they watch TOWIE or Keeping Up With The Kardashians, and I am like why? I watch both programs and I find them quite interesting most of the time, doesn’t make me a black bimbo, because I am nothing like that.

The issue with feminists that hate fashion and beauty related things, is the fact that they are torn between the two – what they want and what men don’t. In their heads, the whole idea of being a feminist, is being equal to men, all around. So most men are not interested in makeup or beauty, so they are not interested, most men don’t watch reality shows, so they don’t watch them, most men are usually hairy on the body, body hairs are considered a masculine trait, so many do not bother taking them off, so our feminist sisters also refuse to have theirs taken off, and look down on those who do.

For clarification, a feminist is a woman seeking to achieve equal political, economic, cultural, personal and social rights for women.

Being a feminist has nothing to do with your personal taste in fashion, style or beauty, it has nothing to with programs you like watching, or books you like reading. It has nothing to do with your background, education, sexual orientation or your hobbies.

Fashion and beauty is seen by many as fun and frivolous, and it is kind of, while feminism is seen as a serious cause. They are both separate movements that have nothing to do with each other, except you want them to.

Leather Leggings

I am a feminist, and I am a fashion/beauty conscious woman. I do not need to hate on fashion, to demonstrate a commitment to the feminist cause and neither should you. Whether you hate on these beautiful things I love, for the right or wrong reasons, it does not make you anymore of a feminist, like it does not make me anymore of a feminist for loving them.

 

Fashion & Style Police Interviews Tony Porter

Fashion & Style Police Interviews Tony Porter

I love hosting this interview series because it opens my eyes to the talent out there, and how creative and organised they really are. It kind off takes me behind the scenes, into their world, and I love it. I know I said this will be a monthly series, but I come across some very talented people regularly, and sometimes, it can’t wait a month because I am super excited to talk about them, and share their stories.

Say hello to Tony Porter, he is one of the people to spearhead the idea of the British Fashion Week, now known as the London Fashion Week, 40 years ago. He went on to work in Biba for years, set up a fashion PR firm, and is now concentrating on his new career as a writer, with his gripping fashion memoir – Copies of Whatever Next?, now available on request. Grab a cuppa and enjoy the interview.

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1.    Can you tell us how you started British Fashion Week, now known as London Fashion Week?

At the time I had my own fashion PR business in London, and it surprised my to see how twice a year all our press and buyers went to Paris and Milan to see their fashion weeks. We didn’t have one, so I went to the director of the Clothing Export Council to ask why. He said that if I could collect £500, he would match it, so I went to Zandra Rhodes, Jean Muir, Bruce Oldfield and others who gave me £100 each. I created a little brochure which I distributed with an invitation to top press and through them buyers were assured that if they came for a few days they would see our best designers at times and venues with minimum delays and a guaranteed seat. The designers themselves cooperated and the first British (later London) Fashion Week was a great success with huge international success. That was exactly 40 years ago this month.

2.    How did you cope in the competitive world of fashion?

I concentrated on the PR side of fashion choosing to promote products that were newsworthy and sold by companies who appreciated the value of publicity. There were instances where I had to compete with others, but I found that my manner of expressing myself and the way in which I approached the press usually worked in my favour.

3.    You spent 8 years in Nigeria, and left due to the Biafran war. I would like to know how you found living in Nigeria?

I started there in the army, married there and had three children there and we all loved it. At certain times of the year the climate could be trying, but we got used to that. I learnt Hausa which helped me enjoy the people of the North, while in the South, most people spoke English which enabled me to share their sense of humour which was always only just below the surface.

4.    You have dabbled in the paint, fashion, PR and now writing industry. Which have you found to be the most competitive and why?

PR was the most competitive. I always found that there were three or four others after the same coverage that I was seeking. There was just so much to be achieved with entertainment, press releases etc. but in the end what mattered most were the stories and, in the case of fashion, products which we were trying to promote.

5.    Can you tell us about your fashion memoir ¬¬– Whatever Next?

It is not so much a fashion memoir as my autobiography, of which fashion was a part. It tells of my seven different careers, including selling paint, testing and marketing insecticides, also buying a tiny island off the south coast of Devon, then restoring its art deco hotel. I have also written about my interest in polo, sailing and classic cars. Quite a lot, hence the title Whatever Next?

6.    Where do you see your writing career in 5 years?

Years ago I wrote three short stories for my grandchildren and they loved them. It is far more likely that I will pursue those rather than start on fiction. As things stand, there is no more non-fiction left in me!

 

Whatever Next

 

I enjoyed chatting with Tony Parker. I found his life experiences interesting and refreshing, and I hope you guys enjoyed reading this interview.

Let me know if you did by leaving a comment please.

Thanks for reading.

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