Advertisements

6 Facts about Writing for Huffington Post

typewriter image

 

There’s nothing as exciting as writing for a highly recognized and respected website like Huffington Post! I was so thrilled when I got accepted to be a Huffington Post blogger. There are plenty of opportunities hidden behind writing for Huffington Post. It all depends on how you make use of these opportunities. There are some writers who do not encourage writing for Huffington Post, and there are some who are blatantly against it. I am neither, I am all about how to make the most of any opportunity I get and writing for Huffington Post when I have the time does have its perks. It all depends on how you make use of the opportunities Huffington Post offers you. Here are 6 facts you should know about writing for Huffington Post:
1.    Huffington Post does not pay its bloggers
This is one of the main reasons many writers are against writing for Huffington Post, and they are right –to some degree – to feel upset for not getting paid for their hard work. What they don’t know is that you can land sponsorship deals with businesses and advertisers. The money that you’d get from those deals will be adequate compensation for the hard work you put in writing for Huffington Post. Sometimes we have to look at things differently to see the big picture. I choose to write freshly written articles Huffington Post on rare occasions (I have written only once this year) because I need the credibility, I want to be able to reach a wider audience, and I want the freedom to write certain articles I won’t want to publish on my blog.
2.    Huffington Post does not publicize your articles
Promotion is not Huffington Post’s responsibility. It’s yours. You are responsible for your success as a Huffington Post blogger. Promotions can be a lot of work but it is extremely rewarding. As you share your posts on social media or to your subscribers in your email list, you are creating awareness about your writing skills. This is a good way of attracting clients to yourself.
3.    Writers can leverage on Huffington Post’s prestige
This means a lot for a Huffington Post blogger. Having the articles you published on Huffington Post looks very good in your portfolio. Since Huffington Post’s credibility is known all over, people will respect you as a writer. This opens doors for paid opportunities.
4.    It validates your work
You know how competitive it is in the writing space – in fact, any industry. So when you pitch for work, you have to compete against so many other people pitching just like you. Saying that you’re a Huffington Post blogger sets you apart from the crowd. It creates the impression that you are skilled and credible. Since you were able to make it to Huffington Post, this gives you an edge over other applicants.
5.    Huffington Post allows you to republish your earlier work
Unlike some websites that don’t allow you to republish your posts anywhere else, Huffington Post gives you the opportunity to do so if you wish. This is time-saving, especially when you’re also trying to maintain your own blog. You can republish your earlier blog posts on Huffington Post while you concentrate on creating new content for your blog. However I always write freshly written articles for Huffington Post, I don’t like confusing Google by republishing my blog content but many writers do. At the end of the day, the choice is yours.
6.    Access to exposure on Huffington Post
Huffington Post is very popular and it receives a high dose of traffic from its loyal readers. When you write for Huffington Post your article gets a chance to be viewed by several readers on Huffington Post. This helps to increase exposure to your article as well as to all the other articles you had written for Huffington Post. You may also get traffic and new followers on your blog and social media platforms if you include your links at the end of your articles.

 

Do you write for Huffington Post? Would you consider writing for Huffington Post? Do share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Thanks for reading.

Advertisements

Why Creatives Should Not Work For Free

I’ve been doing a lot of soul-searching for the past couple of days, regarding the whole ‘working for exposure’.  It seems many creatives are not being compensated for their skills and time, and it sucks!

Denim Outfit Photo

It is really sad that creatives fall victim of working for free for the sake of building their portfolios, gaining exposure and building relationships with potential clients and influencers, only to be exploited and disregarded in the end. I’m not saying that working for free is wrong, because it is not as long as you are comfortable with the terms. Most of the high-earning creatives we look up to may have started off, offering their services for free at some point. I just feel that we creatives deserve to be valued and well compensated for our time and skills.

I can’t imagine how I would react if someone told me to write my book “How To Cash In As A Blogger” and give it out for free everyday. I probably would laugh in your face because I worked on it for over a year, from start to finish. Not that I plan to retire on it, but I won’t just give it out for free everyday. Or how a photographer would feel if they were asked to be a wedding photographer, and would be paid exposure/retweets in return. But it happens. I have lost count of the number of times I have been asked to work in return for exposure. To be fair, the silly requests have reduced. I guess bad news travels quickly and the PRs/brands now know not to contact me asking for such demands, but I still get them every now and again.The annoying part of it all is the paid individual contacting me, asking me to work for exposure. You are getting paid for your job, so why would you think I would want to work for you in return of exposure?

I recently turned down a big blogger outreach job down because the client had no interest in paying bloggers, and I knew I could not go ahead with the gig because I won’t work with me. Now please note I was offered a high hourly rate to do this job, but I could not bring myself to ask bloggers to share this client’s details on their blogs, and offer them nothing in return. It just felt wrong and I made sure the client knew this but I guess someone else will take the offer and start bombarding bloggers with crazy requests in return for ‘possible exposure’, not even guaranteed, so cheeky.

IMG_2988

 

After a great deal of thinking and soul searching, I have come up with a few reasons why creatives should not work for free, just incase you were wondering –

It doesn’t pay the bills
Let’s face it: creatives don’t only do what they do because they love it; they have to earn a living as well. Doing things for free will not get the bills paid or satisfy your household expenses. Retweets and likes do not pay the bills.

 It undermines the value of your ability and that of other creatives
Now I don’t know about you but this is a major reason for me. When you work for free, some clients will take your work for granted irrespective of how much time and effort you put into the project. And that’s how clients will start seeing other creatives too. Your work is valuable. Being paid acts as a sign of respect for your work and a reward for what you put in it. If you insist on working for free, its fine. 99% of the time, you will catch the client paying someone else who actually values their time and effort.

It does not create loyalty

I have been stupid enough to work for free thinking the client will use me again and this time pay me. It never happen. When you do free work, your clients will believe that you are fine with it and expect you to keep working for them for free. Eventually it makes it extremely difficult to ask for a reasonable fee for your work because they have already gotten used to not paying you. You are not worth any amount in their eyes.

It wastes your time
Working for free robs you of the time to do something more productive like pitching to potential clients, building relationships or taking care of your business and actually getting paid.

It makes it difficult to define boundaries for your work
When you work for free, you can’t define how much time you should spend on the project and how much you should put into it. In the end it gives clients room to add more specs to the project, which robs you of more time.

So before you accept to work for free, take a breather and ask yourself “How will it benefit me?” If you do choose to work for free, make sure you make it work to your advantage. You are giving more than your time and ability. You are giving away your skills and talent for free. Wise up!

What are your thoughts on working in return for exposure? Free feel to share your stories in the comment section. All opinions are welcome.

error: Content is protected !!