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Fashion & Style Police Chats With Threads by Dreads

Threads by Dreads Collection Image

 

I love chatting with successful business men and women. I like to know what makes them tick. And I like to unlearn and pick up a thing or 2 from their experiences. I came across Threads by Dreads a year ago on Instagram, and I have been following the brand’s designs ever since. I got to chat with the lovely lady (Christiana) behind the successful brand, and I had the opportunity to interview her. So grab a cuppa and enjoy the read and the amazing pictures from her latest collection.

 

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Can you tell me what Threads by Dreads is all about and the idea behind the brand?

Threads by Dreads is an extension of what and how I feel. This brand entails more than just fashion design…the Threads by Dreads is about showcasing the evolution of modern, African wear. I yearned to create something that is original and unique, while still incorporating my
Ghanaian culture. I dived into fashion head first, without the basics and foundations of the fashion industry or sewing experience. So with that
caveat, I challenged myself to learn as much as possible in order to make my designs come to life. It is imperative for me to stay fully grounded
with the roots of my ancestors and perpetuate the sustenance of my heritage.

How have you found the competition fashion industry?

Honestly I feel as though when innovative and daring designers come together…the possibilities are truly endless! I would love to collaborate
with the right people! I design and wear clothing that isn’t common. However from what I have learned, the fashion industry is extremely
competitive. For starters, staying on top of fashion innovation, new skills and resources is imperative. As a business, I am successful because of my valued customers, it is crucial that I hear them out in order for me to serve them effectively.

Christiana Threads by Dreads Image

 

Describe a typical working day in your life?

Currently, a typical day for me includes, fulfilling orders, communicating and networking ( a lot via email, text, social media, meetings and phone
calls), in addition to production and operations, I also stay on top of future opportunities for fashion shows, sponsorships and retail events.
Did I mention that I also have a full-time job? 🙂

If you could go back in time, what will you do differently with regards to the brand?

Ha! Looking back on the journey thus far…I would say I should’ve sat my butt down to acquire more skills from Sewing/Fashion classes and connect
with exemplary pioneers in the industry. For me, the desire to keep learning is what keeps me going, I want to know the dynamics and mechanics
of the fashion industry, operations, design and successfully implementing everything from ‘A’ to ‘Z’. It’s never too late to begin a new adventure
and learn something new!

Threads by Dreads Picture

 

Can you tell me about your new collection? What should we expect?

With our new line up, you can expect to see new designs from our Fall/Winter wear. In our upcoming unveiling, you can expect to see pull
over jackets, shirts, skirts, dresses and blazers in the coming months. Our clothing is not gender specific, fashion is for everyone!

Where do you get your inspiration from?

My inspiration comes from a variety of sources. My most memorable inspiration comes from my mother, she was truly a woman of style and
grace! I remember how she would proudly wear custom pieces made from Ghana and add accessories to complete her ensemble. May God continue to keep her. I could be reading a magazine or blog, watching the news, exercising at the park or attending a runway event…fashion and design surrounds us, it’s in nature and encrypted in the walls of our temples. Oddly enough, I also get my inspiration from the designs I don’t like. I’m always scouting for ways in which I can capitalize on opportunities of making improvements. Constructive criticism is my friend. 🙂

Threads by Dreads African Shorts Image

 

Where do you see Threads by Dreads in 5 years?

This is such a tricky question…lol. I’m the kind of person who believes the sky is not the limit and opportunities can present themselves at any
given time. Threads by Dreads will continue to build a positive brand that evokes on the abundance of beauty and talents that originate from Ghana.
As a business, the brand will make wholesome partnerships and mutually beneficial collaborations that will ultimately get our merchandise in
retail stores globally.

What do you think of the Fashion and Style Police blog?

I have been a fan of the Fashion and Style Police Blog for a while now. I love how Stella covers everything from the latest issue of Cosmopolitan,
and skin care to in-depth product reviews. She is an all-around genius when it comes to covering real life, heart-felt stories and delivering the
hard-core facts. And she’s honest!

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Thanks for the compliments Christiana.

I love this beautiful collection. It is so African, so beautiful…The models are really working it too..

You can shop Threads by Dreads collection. They offer free US shipping, and they ship worldwide, which is fab.

What do you think of this brand and the collection? Please share in the comment section.

 

 

 

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Fashion & Style Police Interviews Premae Skincare Founder – Dr Clare Eluka

I chatted with the talented and beautiful Dr Clare Eluka, the founder of the fantastic Premae Skincare; the world’s 1st freefrom beauty brand. You should remember my review of the Premae Harmony Face Wash and Foundation some weeks back. Well this is the lady behind the magic! Clare Eluka is 1 of 5 most influential women of West African heritage in business. She is a Qualified Allergy practitioner and UK’s Top 20 Natural Beauty Expert.  She previously worked in The Body Shop as a skincare trainer, and at Oriflame as an in-house formulator. So you can imagine how excited I was to have a chat with her. Grab a cuppa and enjoy the read.
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1. Can you describe what inspired you to set up the Premae Skincare range and what the brand represents?
I was inspired to create Premae Skincare as I became a Vegan and couldn’t find Vegan skincare that was freefrom nuts, wheat and petrochemicals 5 years ago. Since then, it has become more common, but Premae reigns as the first to be Allergy UK Certified. No other Vegan brand has that certification for now.
2. The Premae Skincare range is the world’s first 100% allergy free natural beauty brand. How do you find the making of natural products?
I trusted my instincts. I began in my kitchen, cooking up balms and cleansers. I mimicked the African and Asian dishes I was cooking that made me feel good. I love curries, so I would use Lemongrass, Ginger and Aloe vera, since it is close to Okra. It was this basic alchemy that developed over 3 years and transpired into a brand with over 40 products.
3. What makes Premae Skincare different from other natural and organic brands?
The formulations of my products are Alkaline. This means the scientific properties of the end formulae are between 6-14 PH Neutral or Alkaline. This is powerful and aids the fast and longterm results of clear, balances skin. Other brands weaken their formulae with acidic chemicals. Our molecular structure are alkaline – electric, vibrational perfect.
4. In your foundation range, there is a shade for every colour, which is amazing. What do you think many brands shy away from extending their lines to accommodate the different shades of colour?
I guess that don’t really care. They know that women will buy what ever is put in front of them. So we moan but we still buy. If women of all shades demanded better products by not purchasing, the wider industry would listen. It has provided a great platform for a new brand like Premae to shine.
Clare Eluka Interview Image
5. I read an old interview you had a while ago, and you said your best-selling foundation shade was the #2 Quinoa, and that 97% of your customers are white women and saying black women do not support each other in general. I agree 100%, very few of us actually support each other. Is that still the case with the clientele or has it improved?
I am pleased to say that since Sept 2015, the demographic of Premae consumers has evened out, with 60% white and European, 30% black Afro-Carribean and the rest is a mix of Asian and Eastern European. This is fantastic and I hope it continues.
6. What would you advise anyone thinking of setting up a vegan skincare range now?
I would urge them to think about their unique selling point. The market is crowded, yet there is always room for a new comer. Work in the beauty industry for 2 years, learn management, finance and marketing strategy. Surround yourself with a small group of advisors, mentors and stay positive.
7. Where do you see Premae Skincare in 5 years?
In every bathroom on the planet!
What are your thoughts? Have you used any Premae Skincare products? Sound off in the comment section.
Thank you for reading.

Fashion & Style Police Interviews Tony Porter

Fashion & Style Police Interviews Tony Porter

I love hosting this interview series because it opens my eyes to the talent out there, and how creative and organised they really are. It kind off takes me behind the scenes, into their world, and I love it. I know I said this will be a monthly series, but I come across some very talented people regularly, and sometimes, it can’t wait a month because I am super excited to talk about them, and share their stories.

Say hello to Tony Porter, he is one of the people to spearhead the idea of the British Fashion Week, now known as the London Fashion Week, 40 years ago. He went on to work in Biba for years, set up a fashion PR firm, and is now concentrating on his new career as a writer, with his gripping fashion memoir – Copies of Whatever Next?, now available on request. Grab a cuppa and enjoy the interview.

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1.    Can you tell us how you started British Fashion Week, now known as London Fashion Week?

At the time I had my own fashion PR business in London, and it surprised my to see how twice a year all our press and buyers went to Paris and Milan to see their fashion weeks. We didn’t have one, so I went to the director of the Clothing Export Council to ask why. He said that if I could collect £500, he would match it, so I went to Zandra Rhodes, Jean Muir, Bruce Oldfield and others who gave me £100 each. I created a little brochure which I distributed with an invitation to top press and through them buyers were assured that if they came for a few days they would see our best designers at times and venues with minimum delays and a guaranteed seat. The designers themselves cooperated and the first British (later London) Fashion Week was a great success with huge international success. That was exactly 40 years ago this month.

2.    How did you cope in the competitive world of fashion?

I concentrated on the PR side of fashion choosing to promote products that were newsworthy and sold by companies who appreciated the value of publicity. There were instances where I had to compete with others, but I found that my manner of expressing myself and the way in which I approached the press usually worked in my favour.

3.    You spent 8 years in Nigeria, and left due to the Biafran war. I would like to know how you found living in Nigeria?

I started there in the army, married there and had three children there and we all loved it. At certain times of the year the climate could be trying, but we got used to that. I learnt Hausa which helped me enjoy the people of the North, while in the South, most people spoke English which enabled me to share their sense of humour which was always only just below the surface.

4.    You have dabbled in the paint, fashion, PR and now writing industry. Which have you found to be the most competitive and why?

PR was the most competitive. I always found that there were three or four others after the same coverage that I was seeking. There was just so much to be achieved with entertainment, press releases etc. but in the end what mattered most were the stories and, in the case of fashion, products which we were trying to promote.

5.    Can you tell us about your fashion memoir ¬¬– Whatever Next?

It is not so much a fashion memoir as my autobiography, of which fashion was a part. It tells of my seven different careers, including selling paint, testing and marketing insecticides, also buying a tiny island off the south coast of Devon, then restoring its art deco hotel. I have also written about my interest in polo, sailing and classic cars. Quite a lot, hence the title Whatever Next?

6.    Where do you see your writing career in 5 years?

Years ago I wrote three short stories for my grandchildren and they loved them. It is far more likely that I will pursue those rather than start on fiction. As things stand, there is no more non-fiction left in me!

 

Whatever Next

 

I enjoyed chatting with Tony Parker. I found his life experiences interesting and refreshing, and I hope you guys enjoyed reading this interview.

Let me know if you did by leaving a comment please.

Thanks for reading.

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