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Why I Left My Customer Service Job

Before I became self-employed, I did various customer service jobs. It was over the phone, so it was ok for me at that time, as I prefer dealing with customer over the phone than  face to face confrontation customer service. I was a customer service agent for well over 4 years, and it was hard. But it paid my bills and kept me busy, so it was all good.

Back then, I always knew I wanted more. The customer service job  was not mentally stimulating enough. It became a chore. The pay wasn’t great and the hours were very long. I even hard to work on some weekends, which I didn’t like much. Plus, I hated it when I had difficult customers or cases to deal with, and that was on a daily basis, making my life even harder.

I have been on both sides of the fence; as a customer service agent and customer. So I know the frustrations of working in a noisy call centre, with complicated systems and absent supervisors. Which is why I try to be extra patient and tolerant when dealing with customer service agents.

I recently came across an infographic done by the guys at CCSN which I found quite interesting. Here is the infographic below.

 

Customer service image

 

I agree with all the information on this infographic. For me, excellent customer service means –

 

I am not kept waiting

I called my phone company the other day and I was on the queue waiting to be answered for almost an hour. That to me is just madness. I like it when my call is answered immediately or within a few minutes. That is my definition of excellent customer service. Keeping customers waiting for hours is totally unacceptable.

 

There are other contact options

I like handling my business online so calling a call centre is usually my last resort. I rather send an email or do what I have to do online. Good customer service would provide other contact options for their customers to make use of. As a full-time blogger, I spend majority of my waking hours online, so I rather so out my utilities and anything else that needs sorting online too.

 

My query is dealt with quickly

The whole small talk thingy confuses me. Why would I want to talk about the weather when dealing with a dodgy broadband service?

I hated small talk as a customer service agent and I hate it as a customer too. It makes no sense to me. I just don’t have the time or the desire to engaged in meaningless chitchat when I call a company. Excellent customer service to me means my query is dealt with quickly and properly.

 

I am not passed around

Being passed from department to department pisses me off. Most times I end up ending the call in frustration. This usually happens when I am unlucky enough to speak with clueless customer service agents.

 

To be frank, good customer service isn’t rocket service. It simply means putting the customer first in all decisions. If companies put their customers first, they will have happy customers and employees.

 

What is your definition of excellent customer service? Please sound off in the comments section.

 

*Collaborative post

 

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Can Blogging be a Full-time Job

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Many people start blogging as a hobby. In fact, a majority of pro-bloggers started blogging as a hobby. They never thought blogging would turn into a profitable business. Some have been able to earn a comfortable income from blogging enough to quit their 9-5 jobs. But does blogging really have the potential to generate such income? Yes it does but it won’t happen for many bloggers.

Blogging is not like a conventional 9-5 job. It allows you flexible hours and you have the luxury of working from anywhere and anytime you want to. But it doesn’t quite work out for every blogger.

Before you can consider blogging as a full-time job, there are some things you need to consider.

There’s more that goes into blogging

Blogging does not only involve creating content and posting it on your blog everyday. There is a lot more to blogging than that. As a blogger you have to promote your posts, pitch to brands, sort out your bookkeeping (or employ someone else to) and engage with people. You have to be a Jack of all trades to succeed as a blogger. Such activities could take up as much as 80% of your time but it is responsible for as much as 90% of your success. It is those activities that will help you earn a comfortable living.

Avenues for multiple streams of income

The real business behind blogging lies in the services you offer and the products you create. Services like consultancy, affiliate marketing or writing sponsored posts help diversify your income and increase your chances of raising your income potential.

Creating courses, ebooks or premium content that you offer in a membership site will create some passive income. These multiple streams of income can make you earn a lot more than your 9-5 salary.

Ability to determine how much income you want to make

Conventional jobs restrict you to a fixed salary. Blogging on the other hand gives you the opportunity to dictate how much money you want to earn. If you want to earn more, you can add more income streams, raise your rates, accept and chase after more work.

Unlike a 9-5 job, as a blogger you are in control of how much you want to earn. Some bloggers were able to earn double and even triple the salary they earned from their 9-5 job. Some even make their one year salary from one month of blogging, it all boils down to how successful you are.

Job security is ensured

With blogging you never run the risk of losing your job or being fired. Your business is always secure. You are your own boss.

Conventional jobs don’t give you this same opportunity. You could lose your job at any time. You work under a boss and you are subject to his orders.

When you’re blogging, your primary duty is to your readers and to your clients: If they like your work, your products or your services, then you will get more views and comments, which will lead to more work/income.

Doing what you love

Self-fulfillment is important in your life. Blogging gives you the opportunity to do what you love. You are able to do what you enjoy doing and at the same time earn a living from it. When you do what you love, there’s no limit to how far you can go or how much you could earn. The sky is just your starting point.

 

 

8 Things Every Pro Blogger Should Do Before Quitting Their Day Job

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If you are among those who are waiting for the right time to quit their 9-5 job, then I have to tell you that there’s never going to be a right time to quit. Quitting your day job after freelancing for a while may seem like a big leap, but with everything all planned out, it can be the best decision you will ever make.
Have you been freelancing or blogging for while and are now ready to take that leap into quitting your job and going Pro? Here are 8 things every pro blogger does before quitting their day job:
1.    Have the right mindset
It may sound strange to have this as the first thing on this list, but having the right mindset before you go into blogging full time is a must. Pro bloggers make sure that they are mentally prepared for full-time blogging because it is a lot of work. It comes with a lot of issues and challenges, so having the right mindset from the start does help.

There will be a lot of business challenges that you may not have experienced from your day job. You will  have a lot of responsibilities. Do not let this scare you. Having a “can-do” attitude will help you grow your career as a full time blogger.
2.    Have some money left aside
When you take that leap into the world of full time blogging, you have to make sure you have some money saved up that will keep you going until you start to get regular income. I know some bloggers who left their day job with nothing to fall back on, or some who left because they had no choice, and yet became successful. But most of these bloggers agree that they should have had some money saved up first before making that move. Having some money saved up to cover your bills and living expenses for some months is ideal.
3.    Develop a strategy on how you can earn money
Don’t leave your day job without having clients! Being your own boss can be exciting but you need to make sure that you have some sort of income coming in from your blog first before you go Pro.
4.    Market yourself regularly
Your blog literally depends on it. You need to constantly promote yourself and your blog so that more people know about you and what you do. The more people know about you and your blog, the higher the possibility of them reading it and becoming regulars. The more readers, the moe followers and engagement. The more followers and engagement, the more money.
5.    Have a schedule
Everything in your day job is planned out: your tasks, goals or deadlines. In the same way, you need to have a schedule for your own business. Have an editorial calendar. Note the days and the frequency with which you will write your blog posts. Set certain days or times when you will edit photos and promote on social media. Have everything concernin your blog all planned out.
6.    Learn the necessary skills

You have to realize that blogging will be a totally different experience from your day job. Most of your time will be spent working on your own, and you will have to be a jack of all trades. You will be writing and editing posts, taking photos and editing them, promoting your posts on social media, moderating and replying comments, handling taxes and bookkeeping. You can always employ others to handle some of these tasks but when you first start out, you will be doing them yourself pretty much. Learning these skills will help you run your blogging business effectively.
7.    Set up your working environment
Just because you’ work from home doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t treat blogging as anything less than a business. Create a space in your house that you can make as an office. Clear up your desk and set up the right environment to work.
8.    Get support from fellow bloggers
Although you will be able to work from the comfort of your home, and if you are like me, you would love it. But there will be times when you would miss a normal working environment. I know I do miss it sometimes. Building a relationship with other bloggers will help you transition into pro blogging nicely. They may have more experience than you do and you can always learn a thing or 2 from another blogger. The learning process is endless.

Are you a pro blogger? How did you transition into pro blogging? If you are not, would you consider blogging full-time?

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